WAM Members


WAM is a diverse research group, made up of members from all over the world.

WAM in enriched by having a membership comprised of established academics, early career researchers and postgraduate students.

Our members contribute to the Centre for Women, Ageing and Media through conference attendance, referencing the work of WAM in publications, and working collaboratively with other groups to ensure a wide range of engagement in the themes present in ‘thinking with age’.

Sherryl Wilson


Senior Lecturer in Media and Cultural studies at the University of the West of England. Her research interests primarily lie in British and American television and television history. She is a founder member of the Women, Ageing and Media (WAM) research network and is the author of a range of works exploring representations of older women in television drama including ‘Beyond Patriarchy: Six Feet Under and the older woman’ in Josephine Dolan and Estella Tincknell (eds) Aging Femininities and ‘She’s Been Away: Ageing, Madness and Memory’ to be published in Aging Studies, 5, Spring 2014.

Estella Tincknell


Associate Professor of Film and Culture at the University of the West of England. She is the co-editor (with Josephine Dolan) of Aging Femininities, Troubling Representations (Cambridge Scholars, 2012) and author of a range of essays on age and gender, including ‘Scourging the Abject Body: Ten Years Younger and Fragmented Femininity under Neoliberalism ‘ in R. Gill and C. Scharff (eds) and New Femininities: Postfeminism, Neoliberalism and Subjectivity (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011).

Margaret Cruikshank


Margaret Cruikshank is the author or editor of seven books, most recently, Learning to be Old: Gender, Culture, and Aging, 3rd ed (2013). Earlier books were honored by the Library Journal and by the Myers Center for Human Rights in Boston. Her anthology of literature about aging, Fierce with Reality, was published in 2006.

Caroline Knudsen


PhD student with WAM. Caroline has worked as an administrator for a number of years, and has recently returned from a 4-year stint in Malta where she worked as a freelance content writer. Having taken her Masters a few years ago, Caroline has decided to return to the word of academia and is currently exploring representations of women and ageing on screen.

Alison Willmott


Alison completed her PhD with WAM/ACT in 2019. Alison has been a social worker for many years, previously working with young people leaving care. A career break in 2008 enabled Alison to complete an MSc by Research, which focused on female careleavers, and explored the impact of social work intervention on their experiences of pregnancy and parenthood. Latterly, Alison has worked with older people with dementia and acute mental illness. Her PhD explores the ageing experience of midlife women who identified with punk.

Lisa-Nike Bühring


Lisa-Nike Bühring completed her PhD on the perception of ageing masculinities with WAM in 2020. Lisa was supervised by Ros Jennings and Hannah Grist. After she finished her Master’s degree in Cologne, Lisa spent seven years in Malta. There she worked as an EFL teacher and EFL Teacher Training in an English language school while at the same time continuing her professional development by completing a CELTA as well as a Diploma in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

Tony Lush


Tony took a combined sociology/psychology BA (Hon) starting at the University of Plymouth and finishing at the University of Gloucestershire. Tony got the ‘bug’, so went on to do an MSc in occupational psychology. Now, Tony is  well into his PhD, researching older adults and their motivations, barriers and moderators concerning physical activity.

Caroline Coyle


PhD student with WAM. Caroline, a poet and artist, lectures in Drama at the Department of Social Science and Design, Athlone Institute of Technology, Ireland. She previously worked as a social care practitioner with young people in residential care. She holds a Masters in Child and Youth Care and a Postgraduate Diploma in Teaching and Learning. Her research interest is in community engagement and social gerontology, specifically women and ageing, using arts based mediums such as poetry, storytelling, film, drama and art as inquiry tools of discovery.

Abigail Gardner


Ab is research lead for the Media School at the University of Gloucestershire. Ab’s recent work has explored themes on ageing and memory with respect to women in popular music and video (Jennings and Gardner [eds] (2012) Rock On; Women, Ageing and Popular Music, Farnham: Ashgate).

Josephine Dolan


Josie is a Reader in Media at the University of Gloucestershire and fully engaged with WAM research partners ENAS, NANAS, DEDAL-LIT with whom she is an expert advisor, as well as being an independent research partner with the Canadian SSHRC ACT project. Josies’ research is located at the intersection of Ageing Studies, British cinema, women and film and the politics of identity.

Hannah Grist


Hannah Grist is Co-Director of the Centre for Women, Ageing and Media (WAM). Hannah was awarded her PhD in cultural studies and memory studies by the University of Gloucestershire.  Hannah has published on questions of ageing, representation and care, and is a specialist in qualitative research methods. She is particularly interested in autoethnography as a method for consciousness raising around questions of ageing and care. Hannah is also engaged in teaching and research around academic practice and higher education. Hannah now works at the University of Bristol, and continues to supervise doctoral and MA research. If you are interested in undertaking doctoral or M-level study with WAM under Hannah’s supervision, please email hannah.grist@bristol.ac.uk for an initial conversation.

Ros Jennings


Ros Jennings is Professor of Ageing, Culture and Media and Co-Director of the Centre for Women, Ageing and Media (WAM) at the University of Gloucestershire, UK. She also has a senior role at the University as its Head of Postgraduate Research. Her passion for research methods and developing researchers and supervisory excellence is at the heart of these combined roles and, in addition to subject expertise, she brings 20 years of experience of these aspects to her supervision, teaching and collaborative work with the European Network in Aging Studies (ENAS) and the Ageing, Communication, Technologies (ACT) partnership